What’s New2019-03-19T20:56:29-07:00

Your Pet’s Healthy Weight

Weight Management for Pets

Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight reduces your pet’s risk of disease and injury, and contributes to a better quality of life and a longer life expectancy for your pet.

How do I know if my pet’s weight is healthy?

First and foremost, have an honest conversation with your veterinarian about your pet’s weight. As a result, your veterinarian can assess your pet’s weight and overall health and make recommendations regarding your pet’s weight, diet and exercise. Your veterinarian can also teach you to assess your pet’s body condition by observing your pet’s body shape and feeling certain parts of your pet’s body.

A healthy weight isn’t simply a number on a scale; it’s about healthy body composition. Remember, a healthy weight is not just a number, as no two pets are the same! Certainly, a healthy body shape is far more important than your pet’s actual weight.

Pet Weight Management
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What are the benefits of keeping my pet at a healthy weight?

Keeping your pet at a healthy weight lowers his/her risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, respiratory disease, kidney disease, and some forms of cancer. Likewise, it can also reduce the risks of injury to bones, joints, and muscles that are associated with excess weight. For example, if your pet has arthritis, keeping him/her at a healthy weight makes it easier to manage the discomfort associated with joint pain. In other words, because excess weight can reduce your pet’s life expectancy by more than two years, keeping your pet trim gives them the best chance of a longer, healthier, and pain-free life.

How do I reduce my pet’s weight?

It’s probably no surprise, but there’s no one-size-fits-all approach or magic remedy to help your pet shed excess pounds. Therefore, what works for one pet doesn’t necessarily work for another pet.

Reaching and maintaining a healthy weight requires a commitment to a healthier lifestyle that achieves a balance between the calories consumed and the calories used by the body for normal functions and activity. For instance, even a modest reduction in weight can significantly reduce your pet’s risk of life-threatening diseases.

In simplest terms, weight loss involves reducing your pet’s caloric intake and increasing their
activity level to burn calories.

Put your pet first

Working with your veterinarian, make an honest assessment of your pet’s health and weight. Does your pet have any medical problems that have been caused – or made worse – by excess weight? Is your pet’s weight putting him/her at a higher risk of disease or problems? Focus on what matters – your pet’s good health and long life.

Make a family commitment

A commitment to reach and maintain a healthy weight for your pet requires a commitment from the entire family – a weight loss plan isn’t going to succeed if one family member sneaks your pet extra food. In short, remind your family that there are many ways other than food to demonstrate and express their love for your family pet.

Feed a nutritious and healthy diet

Firstly, eliminate table scraps and fattening high-calorie treats; keep food treats to a minimum and focus on healthier food and treats; and don’t give into the sad, begging eyes. It may help to slow your pet’s food consumption by using a special bowl or food puzzle that makes it harder for them to gulp their food, or by using toys that dispense food in small amounts (be careful to keep the total daily amount of food within an acceptable amount). Moreover, smaller more frequent feedings may also be of benefit to your pet’s health. Most importantly, feed your pet a balanced, nutritious pet food. Consult with your veterinarian about the best food choice for your pet’s condition.

The recommended feeding amount printed on the pet food label might not be appropriate for your pet. Consult your veterinarian about the amount and frequency of feeding that’s right for your pet.

Set Goals

Work with your veterinarian as a team to develop realistic goals for reducing your pet’s weight in a healthy manner. Rapid weight loss can result in serious health problems, so ask your veterinarian for recommendations for healthier eating and exercise that will produce a reasonable and safe rate of weight loss based on your pet’s overall health.

Make it fun

Being more active and living a healthier lifestyle benefits the entire family. Find activities you enjoy that can include your pet, and the journey will be more enjoyable for all of you.

Monitor and Record Your Progress

Once you’ve set reasonable goals to achieve and maintain your pet’s healthy weight, be sure to monitor and record your pet’s progress. Certainly, as with all weight loss programs, there will be successes and there will be missteps. However, by monitoring and recording your pet’s progress, you can determine what’s working and what’s not effective, and make adjustments as needed to the program.

Maintaining your pet’s healthy weight gives your pet the best chance of living a healthier, longer life as a beloved member of your family. Talk to your veterinarian today about your pet’s weight.

Weight Charts

Toy Dogs

Canine Weight Management
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Small Dogs

Canine Weight Management
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Medium Dogs

Canine Weight Management - Medium Dog
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Large Dogs

Canine Weight Management - Large Dog
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Cats

Feline Weight Management
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December 20th, 2018|What's New|

December is all about giving back for DDAH

Canine Feline Dental Health

As of Nov. 11th, The North Valley Animal Disaster Group has taken in 1,365 animals in their shelters. The organization has teams of rescue workers behind the fire lines rescuing wild animals and pets and providing food and water. These teams then transport the animals to areas outside the evacuation road-blocks where other teams take the animals to veterinarians who are ready and eager to help. They are asking for monetary donations through their website: www.nvadg.org or by mailing a check to NVADG, PO Box 441, Chico, CA 95927.

ANY DONATION IS APPRECIATED!
DDAH WILL MATCH DONATIONS MADE AT THE CLINIC
AND SEND TO THE NORTH VALLEY ANIMAL DISASTER GROUP

FEEL FREE TO DONATE ON YOUR OWN AT
www.nvadg.org

Or mail a check to NVADG, PO Box 441, Chico, CA 95927

“BE KIND TO EVERY KIND, NOT JUST MANKIND.”

North Valley Animal Disaster Group
November 30th, 2018|What's New|

Canine and Feline Vaccine Requirements

The doctors at Desert Dunes have updated vaccine requirements recently to include Canine Influenza as an annual vaccine. As a result, starting October 1st, 2018, it will be mandatory for all dogs using our boarding or bathing facilities to be completely vaccinated. In addition, if your pet has a current annual examination, you can come in without an appointment at any time to have the first vaccine started. Subsequently, the 2nd booster (second Influenza) is 3 weeks after the initial Influenza Vaccine. In short, it takes 6 weeks to be completely vaccinated for the series of Canine Influenza so please plan accordingly.

Find Out More

Canine Vaccine Requirements

Rabies
Da2pp
Bordetella
Influenza

Feline Vaccine Requirements

Rabies
FVRCP

OUTDOOR CATS:
Rabies

FVRCP
Leukemia

A Note from Dr. Jackman
July 2nd, 2018|What's New|
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